Golf Drivers


Drivers are typically used off the tee on long holes. They are also the longest golf club in your bag, which can make them tough to hit. If a golf hole is a par 4 or par 5, most people would use their driver off the tee. Although, I have played with older golfers who from time to time, will use their driver on par 3’s, just because they don’t hit the ball very far anymore or perhaps they are hitting the ball into a stiff wind.

use a driver off the teeThe driver (it is also sometimes called the 1 wood) has the lowest loft of any golf club in your bag. The loft is the angle of the club face. It will control the trajectory of the golf ball and determine how far the ball travels in the air, if hit properly. A driver usually has a loft between 7 and 12 degrees. Most amateur golfers would typically have a driver with a loft of 10 degrees or more because the lower the loft of the driver, the harder it is to hit properly. Most PGA tour professionals today carry drivers with lofts of 8.5 to 10 degrees or more which is a huge change given that during the mid to late 1990’s, the average loft on the PGA Tour driver was around 7 degrees.

Most golfers also carry a 3 wood and sometimes a 5 wood in their bag. A 3 wood has a loft between 15 and 18 degrees, and a 5 wood has a loft between 20 and 22 degrees. The higher the golf club number, the higher the loft. Also, the higher the golf club number, the shorter the club shaft length. The 3 wood and 5 wood are commonly referred to as fairway woods, because they are most often used for your second shot off the fairway. The pros will sometimes use a driver off the fairway for a very long par 5 and they are trying to reach the green in 2 shots, but it is a very difficult shot to hit. All higher lofted woods (7, 9, 11, and so on) are commonly referred to as utility woods or rescue woods. A 3 wood is generally ½” shorter than a driver and so on with each successive club.

Why are drivers called woods when they aren’t made of wood? Drivers used to be made of wood, but since the 1980’s woods have been made of metal. It was determined that metal drivers had larger sweet spots which made it easier for a golfer to hit the ball even if they didn’t hit it properly, (known as a mishit).

If you’re looking at replacing your existing driver or just want to see what else is out there on the market, please take a look at the following link. You just may find something you’re looking for to help improve your game.

 

4 thoughts on “Golf Drivers

  • October 6, 2016 at 8:25 pm
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    While I am not a golf fan this was very interesting and informative. I was entertained also. As a person who could never hit a golf ball off the tee in High school I applaud the skill of golfers. How long did it take you to learn to be a good golfer?
    Also it is Interesting that Tigers name was…. Woods lol. I think he was known for his long ball driving accuracy rather his putting. Is that true?

    Reply
    • October 7, 2016 at 5:18 am
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      Thank you for your comments! I must admit, after watching the Ryder Cup which just completed this past weekend, the skill level of these golfers is truly amazing. To watch them hit the ball so far and so accurately is a real joy to watch. It just makes me want to practice more, even though I will never be in the same class as these players. I’m still trying to learn to be a good golfer. There are many aspects that I need to work on to be consistent, but given that I only play once maybe twice a week, it’s hard to get consistent. Maybe when I retire next year, I will be able to practice more and get better. It is interesting with Tiger’s last name. He could sure hit a long golf ball. I think he was a pretty good putter as well, otherwise he wouldn’t have won all those tournaments.
      Regards,
      Shawn

      Reply
  • October 9, 2016 at 1:53 pm
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    Hi Shaun
    Thanks for all the info, I never even new that they made woods out to 9, 11 and beyond. You mentioned that they are know as rescue woods, what sort of situation would I have to find myself in where a using a high loft wood would be superior to just using an iron?
    Thanks
    Dom

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    • October 9, 2016 at 2:46 pm
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      Hi Dominic,
      Thank you for your comments and your question. I find that most people that I know tend to use their rescue woods when their ball is in the thick rough. The rescue club is easier to hit in the thick grass as opposed to an iron. The thick grass usually grabs the clubface of the iron and makes it harder to make good contact with the ball, causing the ball to come up short of the intended target.
      Hope this helps!
      Regards,
      Shawn

      Reply

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