Golf Irons


Purposes and Types of Irons

Forged Irons (Known as Blades)

There are different methods for making forged irons, but in all cases, forged irons are made from a single piece of steel. The steel is heated and then molded into shape by a pressing machine. Forged irons are also known as blades because the shape of them resembles the blade of a knife. These types of irons were very popular, even into the late 80’s. However, with technical improvements in the construction of cast-iron clubs, by the mid 90’s, only about half of the players on the PGA Tour were still using forged irons.

Forged irons are harder clubs to hit for the beginner or even average player because they typically have smaller heads and therefore smaller sweet spots, so it’s easier to mishit them if you don’t have a proper golf swing.

Advantages:

Forged irons typically maintain more weight in the center of the club head when compared to cavity-back clubs. As a result, top players who consistently hit the sweet spot with their swings will enjoy greater accuracy. Although golfers can often get away with mishits when using a cavity-back club, some pros believe that the challenge of hitting with forged clubs helps their overall games. A forged club head’s construction is also more consistent than that of a cast iron club head. The casting process typically traps tiny air bubbles within the liquid metal, in contrast to a completely solid forged iron. Additionally, current manufacturing techniques allow forged irons to be constructed with cavity-back features, giving devotees of forged irons the best of both worlds.

Cast Irons (Known as Cavity-Back)

Cast-iron clubs are made from liquid metal that is poured into a mold and allowed to cool. Then, the forms are broken to expose the new “blank” club heads. Additional machining transforms these “blanks” into finished clubs. The advantages of cast irons are their flexibility and price. Manufacturers can easily create club heads of any shape, and they can do it more inexpensively than making forged clubs.

Casting technology led to the introduction of cavity-back clubs, which have thick ridges around the rear perimeter of the club head, leaving a cavity in the middle. Cavity backs are preferred by beginner or average golfers because their technology helps them improve their games because the cast-iron club has a larger sweet spot which is more forgiving when you mishit the golf ball.

Advantages:

The weight of a cavity-back club head is more evenly distributed around the perimeter, making cavity backs a better choice for weekend golfers, because the clubs are much more tolerant of mishit balls. Beginner golfers will find it easier to hit the ball straight with a cavity-back iron.

You can find different sets of golf irons at the following link. If you’re looking for a new set of irons, there are plenty of choices and brands available on the market today. Hopefully you will find a set here that suits your game.

6 thoughts on “Golf Irons

  • October 6, 2016 at 8:54 pm
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    I love golf and everything about it, so I was glued to your website! I’ve played golf my whole life and have participated in endless tournaments. Thank you for making your site available to us golf lovers! My fiance my be in the market for a new putter soon!

    Erin

    Reply
    • October 7, 2016 at 5:27 am
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      Hi Erin,
      Thanks for your comments! I’m glad to hear that you enjoy playing golf as well. It is a great sport, isn’t it. You must be pretty good if you play in a lot of tournaments. You must have a low handicap! I hope that your fiance is able to find the putter that he’s looking for on my website! Thanks again.
      Regards,
      Shawn

      Reply
  • October 7, 2016 at 6:35 pm
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    Thank you Shawn for an informative and educational site that actually shows how to correct some bad habits! I enjoyed the videos very much and had no idea that such small differences could make such a large impact on the end game! I liked your site very much and can see why you enjoy playing there,it’s very beautiful!

    Reply
    • October 7, 2016 at 10:06 pm
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      Hi Bob,
      Thanks for the comments! I think after yesterday’s round, I need to review those training fundamental videos. It’s like I had never swung a club before, very frustrating. I really enjoy playing my course, with the beauty and the leaves changing at this time of year, very scenic. It doesn’t take much to make your swing go bad and the slightest adjustment can make a huge difference.
      Best regards,
      Shawn

      Reply
  • July 8, 2017 at 2:29 pm
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    Great article. I’m new to the sport, still learning .. Yesterday I had the chance to play and I shot a 98. Unfortunately, I left my P Wedge on the 12 th hole. Needless to say, I need to buy a new one. Do you have any recomendations?

    Reply
    • July 9, 2017 at 3:09 am
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      Hi Joey!
      Glad to hear you got out for a round, and shooting 98 as a beginner is very good! Sorry to hear you lost your P wedge. Is there a chance your club was turned into the pro shop of the golf course you played at? At the course I’m a member at, we typically will hand in any lost clubs we find to the pro shop so hopefully the owner can reclaim their lost club.
      I suppose it depends on how much you want to spend. You may want to get a new P Wedge that is from the same manufacturer as your current set. I personally use Callaway irons, including my P Wedge, but I do have other wedges in my bag, specifically Cleveland sand wedge, lob wedge and gap wedge. You will find an assortment of wedges on my wedges page https://allthatisgolf.com/golf-wedges. Hopefully you will find one suitable for you.
      Good luck and good golfing!
      Shawn

      Reply

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